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Mississauga Life Early Spring 2015 : Page 23

forestry PARKS AND FORESTRY eab emerald ash borer is killing ash trees It is your responsibility to treat or remove dead or dying Ash trees on your property. EAB is an insect that kills all species of Ash trees native to North America. It has spread through Ontario, Quebec and Northeastern US. Dead and dying Ash trees on public and private property may not be safe. Trees and branches may be more likely to fall during storm weather. Learn more about EAB and what you need to do on mississauga.ca/eab Call 3-1-1 or 905-615-4311 if outside city limits

Eab Emerald Ash Borer Is Killing Ash Trees


Moving forward with EAB active management plan

To combat Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) City Council approved the EAB Active Management Plan in 2012. Through this program, the City will treat, remove and replace city-owned Ash trees. The hope is to preserve some City-owned Ash trees on streets and in parks.

What is the City doing?
The City has inspected all city-owned Ash trees along boulevards and in parks. Sustainable Ash trees on streets and in parks have been treated with TreeAzin. The City continues to inspect woodlots for EAB.

City contracted crews are removing dead or dying Ash trees throughout the City. Timing of the work will depend on weather conditions and the priority work scheduled. Safety is the most important issue when the City determines when to remove a tree.

All Ash trees scheduled to be removed will be marked with an orange X. Residents will receive a notice when the street tree in front of or adjacent to their house is scheduled for removal.

Residents in the surrounding area will receive a notice when trees are to be removed from parks and woodlots. In some instances, parks and woodlots will need to be closed down while the work takes place. Signs will be posted in the affected areas.

On streets and in parks, the tree stump will be removed after the initial tree removal and the ground will be repaired with topsoil and reseeded weather permitting.

It is not necessary to notify the City if the tree in front of or adjacent to your house was removed due to EAB. We have a record of all trees removed due to EAB. The City plans to replant each street and park tree removed due to EAB.

What can you do?
It is your responsibility to treat or remove dead or dying Ash trees on your property.

Once infested with EAB, an Ash tree may die quickly. If your EAB infested Ash tree is located in a yard, along a street or a fence, it could pose a safety risk and you should consider removing it. Safety is the most important issue when determining when to remove your dead or dying Ash tree.

If you have treated your Ash tree, continue to do so. If you have not treated your Ash tree, contact an ISA certified arborist for advice on your tree.

For regular updates on where the City is working and to learn more about EAB and what you need to do, visit the website www.mississauga.ca/eab

EAB is an insect that kills all species of Ash trees native to North America. It has spread through Ontario, Quebec and Northeastern US. Dead and dying Ash trees on public and private property may not be safe. Trees and branches may be more likely to fall during storm weather.

Read the full article at http://ml.epubs.flippagepublishing.com/article/Eab+Emerald+Ash+Borer+Is+Killing+Ash+Trees/1952284/249772/article.html.

Mississauga

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